DERBORENCE RAMUZ FILM

The hard, minute observational character of some of the narration reminds one often of Alain Robbe-Grillet, an apparently-emotionless attention to physical detail which in fact evokes great emotion. Well, in fact, VERY sentimental at times. There, every summer, grazers brought up their cows and sheep and lived in teeny rustic little huts, shoving the animals around and living on bread and cheese inexorably hardening and wishing TV had been invented. It was recorded at the time that, months later, a sole survivor wriggled his way out of the rocks and slabs and went home. The original intention was to publish this new translation with superb photos of the scene, but somewhere I lost both the photos and the energy to pursue it. And the narrative voice is sometimes astonishing – in a single sentence, the narrator’s voice can observe a person, then become the person observing something else, then observe the person observing something else and responding to it, with no confusion or delay for the reader, only a perfect sense of suitability and rightness and a small flash of insight, as the story carries on without a hitch.

It was recorded at the time that, months later, a sole survivor wriggled his way out of the rocks and slabs and went home. So here it is, in three files, and perhaps someday soon with photos stuck on. The Derborence logo at the top of this page was taken in June from Le Godey in the Derborence valley, with the telephone poles and wires removed. The Pas de Chevilles, however, leads steeply up westward over towards Bex in the canton of Vaud [map below], and the Col de Sanetsch leads northwards over towards Gsteig and Gstaad in the canton of Bern. The men from Col de Sanetsch , in the canton of Berne, came from the upper right descending near Godey, as in the photo below chapter 7. The hard, minute observational character of some of the narration reminds one often of Alain Robbe-Grillet, an apparently-emotionless attention to physical detail which in fact evokes great emotion. Translated in about , posted on this site 25 June , updated 21 August , version 5 September

So here it is, in three files, and perhaps someday soon with photos stuck on. There, every summer, degborence brought up their cows and sheep and lived in teeny rustic little huts, shoving the animals around and living on bread and cheese inexorably hardening and wishing TV had been invented.

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Feedback and suggestions are welcome. Visit the Derborence Web site at www. Don’t you grad students give me T. The landslide described in this story shown as Eboulement des Diablerets on the map came from top center. Derborence is still a wonderful place though the chef of the low-cost lodgings there, in Godey, seems frequently to fall off the back porch drunk, leaving the desperate waitress to offer lodgers only salads and the cheese fondue.

And the narrative voice is sometimes astonishing – in a single sentence, the narrator’s voice can observe a person, then become the person observing something else, then observe the person observing something else and responding to it, with no confusion or delay for the reader, only a perfect sense of suitability and rightness and a small flash of insight, as the story carries on without a hitch.

Go ahead to Part I, chapter 1, of Derborence. The original intention was to publish this new translation with superb photos of the scene, but somewhere I lost both the photos and the energy to pursue it. The road shown across the cone of the landslide is modern, leading to a mountain inn and some vacation chalets at the little lake marked mwhich was created by the landslide.

So here’s just the stunning low-key poetry of Ramuz anglicized and dwighticized — the photos may be coming along later. Descending towards Derborence in awkward weatherlooking southwest from below the Col de Sanetsch.

Derborence

The Unsharpened Pen 16th Derbborence reprints Other stuff. It was recorded at the time that, months later, a sole survivor wriggled his way out of the rocks and slabs and went home. Charles Ferdinand Ramuz was born in Lausanne inhung out in Paris with the artsy Big Boys from tothen gratefully came home and never left again. Derborence lies just behind the modern dam at Godey center. Moms, and kids, and all the old dads and grandmoms stayed back in the villages down below.

Derborence () – uniFrance Films

Please do not reproduce this text in any form for commercial purposes. Well, in fact, VERY sentimental at times. The hard, minute observational character of some of the narration reminds one often of Alain Robbe-Grillet, an apparently-emotionless attention to physical detail which in fact evokes great emotion. The Pas de Chevilles, however, leads steeply up westward over towards Bex in the canton of Vaud [map derboeence, and the Col de Sanetsch leads northwards over towards Gsteig and Gstaad in the canton of Bern.

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Eliot’s “objective correlative” at this point, I’m trying to be serious! This is the simple record upon which Ramuz built his superb story.

The Derborence logo at the top of this page was taken in June from Le Godey in the Derborence valley, with the telephone poles and wires removed. But for me, the most devastating narrative technique is Ramuz’s use of repetitiondrawn from Greek drama I suppose, which creates a sense of inevitability, of fate: The men from Col de Sanetschin the canton of Berne, came from the upper right descending near Godey, as in the photo below chapter 7.

All the Derborence photos I can find now have got either me or my semi-friends in them or lots of telephone wires or the concrete fil at Godey, so perhaps one needs to go back there soon and do the job properly. In my own non-expert view, his most outstanding achievement was his creation of a melding of an “artless” Swiss mountain peasant way of thought and expression with a structural idiom based upon the sophisticated mindset of Greek drama and the force of expressionist French poetry.

Peck with rilm from Petit Robert Charles Ferdinand Ramuz was born in Lausanne inhung out in Paris with the artsy Big Boys from tothen gratefully came home and never left again.

And the frequent use of the second-person, telling you the reader what you can see and hear — it’s almost cinematic. The back half of the mountain collapsed and squooshed people, cows, sheep, trees, shrubs, in fact, everything. A path leads from the west over and down from Solalex, Anzeindeand the Pas de Cheville in the canton de Vaud chapters 2, 3, 7.

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Peck with assistance from Petit Robert. Dwight Peck’s lengthy translations. Translated in aboutposted on this site 25 Derborneceupdated 21 Augustversion 5 September Dwight Peck’s lengthy translations Derborence, by Ramuz when the mountain fell translated by D.